Life is Just a Click Away

Sunday, November 7, 2010

NaBloPoMo - Day 7



Awareness.... 

Yesterday I wrote about a different kind of awareness.  Today, I'm writing the kind of awareness we usually talk about.

But this is not so usual either, really.

Have you ever thought about what having diabetes is like if you live in a country that is not as wealthy as the U.S.?  

Honestly, I hadn't given it much thought... until now.  

In some parts of the world, diabetes is still a death sentence.  In some parts of the world, there is not a Walgreens or CVS on every corner - open 24 hours a day.  In some parts of the world there are no pediatric endocrinologists only a short drive away.  No on call doctors.  In some parts of the world, there is little to no insulin.  Meters.  Test strips.  

I'm not saying we don't have our own issues with health care here in America.  We do.  

But I'm very thankful that I was born in a country that made this disease something that you can live with.  I'm glad that a diabetes diagnosis does not equal death.

Honestly, thankful doesn't even BEGIN to describe how utterly appreciative I am.

But not everyone is so lucky....

So, Roche and the Diabetes Hands Foundation are trying to help.

They have created an awesome video.  Less than 2 minutes in length.  

All YOU have to do, is watch it.

Why should you watch this video?

Here's why...

For every view the video receives - between now and November 14th, Diabetes Day - Roche is making a donation to the Diabetes Hands Foundation the entirety of which will be used to assist the Life for a Child program and Insulin for Life. These two global, humanitarian assistance programs provide ongoing care and diabetes education to children in the world's poorest countries - care essential to stay alive.

Donations provide children with life-sustaining insulin, syringes and blood sugar monitoring equipment, teach parents how to care for their child's diabetes, cover transportation costs for supplies, ensure continuous infrastructure improvements and help to develop new programs. Currently more than 25 such programs keep children alive around the world.
With 100,000 views, Roche will give the Foundation its largest donation - $75,000.

If you think your participation doesn't count, Ron Raab, President of Insulin for Life, says differently. "Every time someone watches this video, it will make a real contribution to someone actually staying alive. These donations go a long, long way. In places we assist, like Ecuador, less than 50 dollars keeps a person who needs insulin alive for an entire year."

With your help, children who would die, will live.
Taken from the The Huffington Post Article about the Diabetes Hands Foundation's BiG Blue Test.



So....  What are you waiting for?

You can't tell me that you can't spare 2 minutes to save the life of a child.  

Life is just a click away!

6 comments:

  1. CLICK CLICK CLICK CLICK CLICK...

    Right now.

    There's another mother wondering if her baby will survive with this disease another day.

    Right now.

    CLICK CLICK CLICK CLICK CLICK....

    ReplyDelete
  2. OH pooh ...I can't post a comment because I can't read that screwy writing in the "security" box (I can't subscribe to newsletter,either)... please SOMEONE help out an old girl! ..I have to keep re-doing my comments until I get that stupid letter thing right.. .........Hallie HELP ..how do I get around that?

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  3. oh shoot, NOW IT POSTS! SORRY! ♥♥♥

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  4. Grateful does not begin to describe. We're half way to the 100,000 needed for the full dontation. Keep clicking!!!!

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  5. Keep on CLICKING SWEET PEEPS!!!!

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  6. Yes! Keep on clicking. Our endo does masses of work with African children with diabetes - he's always heading off to somewhere in the deep dark jungle and comes back with amazing stories of survival and coping with the condition. It makes me feel incredibly lucky to have what we do - we are blessed, living in Singapore. Some of the stuff these kids go through is incredible - but awe-inspiring. How they and their parents cope is beyond me - but many of them do cope, amazingly well, with very little. Let's give them more by clicking away on this film!

    ReplyDelete

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